Course Objectives

Humanities and Philosophy Program Learning Objectives

Students will:

  • Recognize the foundations, central ideas, and expressions of a variety of cultures, value systems,
  • and philosophical perspectives.
  • Think critically about the historical development of foundations, central ideas, and expressions
  • within society and how these inform contemporary conversations.
  • Demonstrate an increased ability to communicate ideas about cultures, value systems,
  • philosophical perspectives and historical context in verbal and written form.
  • Identify and evaluate great texts and enduring creative expressions that provide important sources
  • of information about cultures, value systems and philosophical perspectives.

PHIL 1000 (Introduction to Philosophy) Course Learning Objectives

Students will demonstrate:

  • A basic knowledge of the various speculative traditions and prominent thinkers in Western and
  • world philosophy, including epistemology, human nature, metaphysics, reality and being, ethics,
  • and religion.
  • A basic understanding of the way in which philosophical traditions form contemporary world
  • views.
  • Enhanced analytical and critical reading and writing skills.
  • The ability to apply philosophical methods of analysis to everyday experiences.
  • A knowledge of the enduring creative expressions of humans that reflect our experiences, as well
  • as our feelings and ideas about ourselves, other humans, the past, and the universe.
  • Progress in answering the “big questions” for themselves and in realizing the universality of the
  • human condition, by learning how others have asked the same questions in creative ways.

PHIL 1120 (Social Ethics) Course Learning Objectives

  • Students will gain understanding of big questions found in the creative works in the history of
  • philosophy.
  • Students will analyze claims, definitions, and concepts presented by important historical figures,
  • and discuss their efforts, both in discussion and in formal writing.
  • Students will define and examine their own personal value systems in relation to important
  • historical claims.

PHIL 1250 (Reasoning and Rational Decisions) Course Learning Objectives

  • Students will gain understanding of big questions of Epistemology found in the history of
  • philosophy.
  • Students will analyze claims, definitions, and concepts presented by important historical figures
  • concerning the nature and purpose of knowledge, and discuss their efforts, both in discussion and
  • in formal writing.
  • Students will be able to construct a well-reasoned, well-articulated argument about the subject of
  • their choosing.

PHIL 2600 (World Religions: Topics) Course Learning Objectives

Students will:

  • Demonstrate a knowledge of the historical foundations for at least three of the nine living
  • traditions cited in the course description.
  • Describe the nature and diversity of world religions, including points of commonality and
  • difference.
  • Articulate questions presented by these traditions, including how other academic disciplines
  • interact with these traditions.
  • Think critically about these traditions, becoming aware of one’s own biases when approaching primary texts.

PHIL 2900 (Symbolic Logic) Course Learning Objectives

Students will:

  • Identify argument forms in ‘statement logic’ and utilize tests such as truth tables and proofs to determine the validity of the argument.
  • Understand the structure and purpose behind categorical arguments, including the historical significance of such arguments.
  • Pinpoint informal fallacies found from various media sources and respond to such fallacies in articulate, constructive ways.

PHIL 3100 (Aesthetics) Course Learning Objectives

Students will:

  • Describe the substance of discipline of aesthetics, including primary ‘big’ questions (definition of ‘art’, nature/purpose of metaphor, art’s relation to knowledge), methodology, and major viewpoints in the history of the study.
  • Develop an awareness of beauty and the significance of the aesthetic experience as a fundamental characteristic and of human experience by gaining an appreciation for the task of aesthetic reflection on the artistic realm in the western philosophic traditions.
  • Identify the connection between the study of aesthetics and other academic disciplines, and express those connections through a semester long research project.

PHIL 3200 (Philosophy and Literature) Course Learning Objectives

Students will:

  • Demonstrate an enriched appreciation of literature through the distinctive tools of philosophic inquiry, analysis, and argumentation.
  • Engage major philosophical issues (definition/question of personal identity, author/reader interplay, possibility of objective knowledge) often found in works of literature.
  • Utilize the critical thinking, analytic, and writing skills that were developed through a semester long paper project.